Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic team up to explore metabolic syndrome

January 06, 2016

Laurence Miller, M.D., director of research at Mayo Clinic, will lead Mayo's efforts. "This new partnership will expand the already highly successful synergy between ASU and Mayo," Miller says. "We are moving into an area with immense importance for public health, both locally and nationally. Many of our clinicians, clinical investigators, and basic scientists have already engaged in this joint activity. They are energized by the prospects of making a positive difference."

Faculty members from ASU and Mayo Clinic will have access to scientific resources available at both facilities. Additionally, ASU experts in proteomics, genomics and clinical research will continue to provide collaborative opportunities to faculty members in the new center."We are putting together the necessary elements to make this facility useful to researchers at ASU and Mayo Clinic," says Mandarino. "Then we will move on to include researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Eventually we will include outside investigators."

"This joint research program will strengthen the basic research in metabolic biology," says Sethhuraman Panchanathan, deputy vice president in the ASU Office of Research and Economic Affairs. "More importantly, it will result in innovations that make a real impact on the quality and affordability of health care."

Mandarino's research, which includes the study of the mechanisms of insulin resistance, has been supported by the National Institutes of Health for more than 20 years, and he has more than 100 publications in peer-reviewed journals. Earlier this year, Mandarino received the Cure Award from the American Diabetes Association. The award is presented to a key researcher who is engaged in basic or clinical research focusing on the treatment, cure or prevention of diabetes and its complications.

Source: Mayo Clinic