National Institutes of Health grants $12 million to WCDRC for obesity research

November 24, 2015

This ARRA-funded study will support the development of a National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) multi-center clinical trial to study the connection between erectile dysfunction (ED) and lifestyle interventions, such as weight loss and increased physical activity. ED affects approximately 30 million men in the United States and can be an early warning sign for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent studies suggest that lifestyle interventions may offer a promising approach that could improve ED as well as reduce CVD risk. Miriam researchers will develop a proposal for a full-scale clinical trial to determine whether an intensive lifestyle intervention results in greater improvement in ED.

The Look AHEAD continuation: Impact of weight loss intervention on Type 2 diabetes

This NIDDK grant, funded by ARRA, will provide supplementary funding for Look AHEAD (Action for Health in Diabetes) to enhance retention and expand the outcome measures in this trial. Look AHEAD is a randomized, multi-site clinical trial examining whether weight loss achieved through an intensive lifestyle intervention can reduce CVD and CVD-related death among overweight individuals with Type 2 diabetes.

Gene X behavior interaction in the Look AHEAD study

In a related study, Wing and colleague Jeanne McCaffery, PhD, also of the WCDRC, will try to identify specific genes that predict individual differences in weight loss achieved in behavioral interventions. These genetic factors may shed some light on why some individuals are successful and others struggle to achieve weight loss. This study, which is also funded by NIDDK, will include participants in the Look AHEAD trial.

The ARRA of 2009, passed by Congress in February, opened up funding opportunities for new projects as well as supplemental funding for projects that already are well on their way to achieving significant results. The NIH Challenge Grant program is designed to spur new areas of research in 15 broad scientific areas the agency believes will benefit from a jumpstart or in which scientific challenges need to be overcome, including behavioral change and prevention.

Source: Lifespan